Category Archives: Teaching Literature and Writing

A Cup of Tea

Many years ago, a professor from one of the western world’s great universities went to visit the Japanese master Nan-in to learn about Zen. Nan-in invited the professor to sit and offered him tea. As Nan-in prepared the tea, the … Continue reading

Posted in Epistemology, Philosophy, Teaching Literature and Writing | 6 Comments

The Limits of Learning

OK, I admit it. I haven’t read The Vicar of Wakefield. I’m always suspicious of people who have that air about them of having read everything.  I’m onto them. Here’s why: Years ago, when I was an undergraduate at Indiana, … Continue reading

Posted in Epistemology, Teaching Literature and Writing | 4 Comments

Prototypes versus Aristotelian Categories in the Teaching of Writing

During the last few decades of the twentieth century, rhetorical ideas dominated academic discourse in the humanities. It is difficult to overstate, for example, the influence during that time of such ideas as “All speech is political” or “Readers construct … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Literature and Writing | 2 Comments