Category Archives: Epistemology

The Vast Unseen and the Vast Unseeable: Reconciling Belief and Nonbelief

Those who are not philosophically inclined can be divided, roughly, into two groups: There are the Naïve Realists who think that what is available to the senses or potentially available to the senses is all that there is. And then … Continue reading

Posted in Epistemology, Metaphysics, Philosophy, Philosophy of Mind, Religion, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A Cup of Tea

Many years ago, a professor from one of the western world’s great universities went to visit the Japanese master Nan-in to learn about Zen. Nan-in invited the professor to sit and offered him tea. As Nan-in prepared the tea, the … Continue reading

Posted in Epistemology, Philosophy, Teaching Literature and Writing | 6 Comments

The Limits of Learning

OK, I admit it. I haven’t read The Vicar of Wakefield. I’m always suspicious of people who have that air about them of having read everything.  I’m onto them. Here’s why: Years ago, when I was an undergraduate at Indiana, … Continue reading

Posted in Epistemology, Teaching Literature and Writing | 4 Comments

The Vast Unseen and the Vast Unseeable

Those who are not philosophically inclined can be divided, roughly, into two groups: There are the Naïve Realists who think that what is available to the senses or potentially available to the senses is all that there is. And then … Continue reading

Posted in Epistemology, Metaphysics, Philosophy, Philosophy of Mind | 2 Comments